Wild Dogs; Master Hunters

wild dogs

 

The number of wild dogs has dropped significantly in the past few decades.  While some of this is due to disease, the most significant reason is loss of habitat, making man the wild dog’s main threat. The number of wild dogs has dropped significantly in the past few decades.  While some of this is due to disease, the most significant reason is loss of habitat, making man the wild dog’s main threat.

 

When we think of African predators, the big cats instantly come to mind.  But interestingly, wild dogs are the most efficient hunter on the continent, catching 85% of their prey—not a bad day’s work.  The pack works together using their speed & cooperation during a hunt.  But endurance is the key to their success.  Much like a flock of migrating geese, the wild dogs do a sort of relay hunt to conserve energy: when the front runner gets tired, he is replaced by a fresh runner until their prey gives in to exhaustion.

It’s sad to see any species of animal fall victim to extinction, and the wild dog is now in fear of being added to this list.  Luckily there are many efforts worthy of support and gratitude that are trying to safeguard their existence.  Let’s hope the endurance and teamwork of the wild dog not only aids in catching prey, but ensures a bright future for generations to come.

 

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